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General Information

Undergraduate Studies

Graduate Studies

Research

Continuing Education & Training Programs

Appendix: Personnel & Enrollment

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

trio guitar2 director
undergrad
 Physics


Department of Science
School of Sciences and Engineering (SSE)

Professors: S. Arafa, F. Assabghy, M. Gaafar, H. Omar
Associate Professors: A. El Fiqi (Unit Head), A. Shaarawi
Assistant Professors: T. Hassanein, R. Singleton

The excitement of discovery can be experienced when we learn the value of Physics in solving practical problems and in gaining insight into everyday phenomena, and its significance as an achievement of the human intellect in its quest for understanding the world we all live in.

Physics has always attracted special students, challenged by modern theories that shaped and are still shaping our understanding of the universe like the theory of relativity, quantum mechanics, superconductivity and particle physics; just to name a few. A degree in Physics leaves one poised to enter many professions that include but are not limited to traditional physics. The discipline of Physics teaches skills that are transferable to many other professions, including electronics, computer and oil industries. These transferable skills include: mathematical modeling, problem solving, designing experiments, interpretation of experimental data, reflecting on answers before trusting them, research experience, laboratory techniques and communication skills.

Bachelor of Science

The undergraduate program in physics is designed to give students a thorough but flexible training in the fundamental aspects of classical and modern physics. Lecture material is reinforced and complemented by closely integrated laboratory work. The varied course offerings provide several options from which students may choose according to their interests and abilities.

Students may also elect to minor in any field using their general electives and a maximum of 9 hours from the concentration electives in order to satisfy the requirements for the minor.

A student who intends to major in physics must complete successfully PHYS 111, PHYS 123 L, PHYS 112, PHYS 124 L, MATH 131 and MATH 132 with a minimum GPA of 2.5 in these courses. To change from any other major to physics the student should have completed the above courses, in addition to an overall and concentration GPA's not less than 2.5.

A total of 132 credit hours is required for the bachelor's degree in physics distributed as follows:

Core Curriculum (40 credits)

The science requirement of the core curriculum electives is met within the physics concentration requirements.

Concentration Requirements (43 credits)

PHYS

111

Classical Mechanics, Sound and Heat

 

112

Electricity and Magnetism

 

123L

Geneal Physics Lab I

 

124L

General Physics II

 

204L

Optics Laboratory

 

211

Introduction to Relativity & Nuclear Physics

 

212

Introduction to Quantum Mechanics

 

214

Waves, Optics and Atomic Physics

 

215

Introduction to Circuit Analysis and Devices

 

221L

Intermediate Physics Lab I

 

311

Thermodynamics and Statitical Mechanics

 

312

Theoretical Mechanics

 

313

Nuclear Physics

 

316

Electromagnetic Theory I

 

321L

Advanced Physics Lab I

 

322L

Advanced Physics Lab II

 

323L

Advanced Physics Lab III

 

325

Introduction to Solid-State Physics

 


Concentration electives (21 credits):
To be taken from the 300 or 400 level courses in physics and mathematics (upon the approval of the advisor)

Collateral Requirements (26 credits)

CHEM

105

General Chemistry I

 

106

General Chemistry II

 

115L

General Chemistry Lab I

 

116L

General Chemistry Lab II

CSCI

106

Fundamentals of Computer Science

MATH

131

Calculus and Analytical Geometry I

 

132

Calculus and Analytical Geometry II

 

231

Calculus and Analystical Geometry II

MATH

232

Calculus and Analytical Geometry IV

 

233

Differential Equations

SCI

401

Senior Thesis and Seminar

 


In special cases, and with advisor's approval, another 400-level course may be subsituted for the Senior Thesis and Seminar.

General Electives (6-15 credits)

Electronics option

Students may choose the electronics option within the bachelor's degree program by following the required sequence of electronics courses listed below. While retaining the fundamentals of the conventional degree in physics, this option prepares students to meet the needs of an expanding and increasingly vital area of sciences and engineering.

The 21 credits of concentration electives for the electronics option should cover:

PHYS

222L

Intermediate Physics Lab II

2

 

315

Operational Amplifiers and Applications

3

 

319

Digital Logic Design

3

 

320L

Digital Logic Design Lab

1

 


and a minimum of 13 credits selected from the following:

PHYS

318

Linear Systems Analysis

3

 

411

Automatic Control

3

 

412

Semiconductor Physics

3

 

415

Selected Topics

3

 

417

Solid State Devices

3

 

418

Network Design and Computer Methods

3

 

419

Microelectronics

3

 

429

Microprocessors

4

CSCI

330

Computer Architecture

3

ENG

318

General Electrical Engineering

3

 


Minor

The minor in physics is designed to provide students majoring in science, computer science or engineering with the opportunity of completing their major disciplines with a series of courses designed to provide in-depth appreciation of physics. A choice is provided to allow students to satisfy their interest in either solid state physics or nuclear physics.

Requirements (17 credits)

PHYS

211

Introduction to Relativity and Nuclear Physics

3

 

212

Introduction to Quantum Mechanics

3

PHYS

316

EM Theory I

3

 

421

Quantum Mechanics

3

 


and either

PHYS

325

Introduction to Solid State Physics

3

 

322L

Advanced Physics Lab II

2

 

OR

PHYS

313

Nuclear Physics

4

 

321L

Advanced Physics Lab I

1

 

 

Physics Courses (PHYS)
 

 CourseNumber CourseTitle

100

Physics for Poets

111

Classical Mechanics, Sound and Heat

112

Electricity and Magnetism

123L

General Physics Laboratory I

124L

General Physics Laboratory II

204L

Optics Laboratory

211

Introduction to Relativity and Nuclear Physics

212

Introduction to Qantum Mechanics

214

Waves, Optics and Atomic Physics

215

Introduction to Circuit Analysis and Devices

221L

Intermediate Physics Laboratory I 

222L

Intermediate Physics Laboratory II

311

Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics

312

Theoretical Mechanics

313

Nuclear Physics

315

Operational Amplifiers and Applications

316

Electromagnetic Theory I

317

Electromagnetic Theory II

318

Linear Systems Analysis

319

Digital Logic Design

320L

Digital Logic Design Lab

321L

Advanced Physics I Laboratory

322L

Advanced Physics II Laboratory

323L

Advanced Physics III Laboratory

325

Introduction to Solid-State Physics

411

Automatic Control

412

Semiconductor Physics

415

Selected Topics in Physics

416

Experimental Techniques in Solid-State Research

417

Solid-State Devices

418

Network Design and Computer Methods

419

Microelectronics

421

Quantum Mechanics

429

Microprocessors

432L

Automatic Control Lab

 

Copyright 2000-2001, The American University in Cairo

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